Displaying items by tag: nutrition obesity research center

Hill comes to UAB from the University of Colorado, where he was director of the Center for Human Nutrition at UC Health Sciences.
Fobian is interested in reducing childhood and adolescent obesity by assessing new and innovative factors that may be successful in obesity interventions.
Researchers suggest combining a calorie-restricted diet with high-intensity interval training could be a solution for reducing weight regain after weight loss.

The American College of Nutrition recognizes David Allison, Ph.D., and his continued advancement of research in diet and nutrition. 

Among black men, those with a high degree of West African genetic ancestry have less abdominal fat than those with a lower degree.
UAB researchers find that epigenetic changes associated with chronic obesity alter expression of memory-related genes in the brain.
Jessica Williams, Ph.D., assistant professor in the UAB Department of Health Services Administration, received a $100,000 New Connections grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to examine perceptions of discrimination in health care settings.
A new study from UAB could provide the first known data about the impact of dietary patterns on dietary adherence and cardiometabolic risk factors in adults with spinal cord injury.
Blood tests in obese African-American teenage girls reveal immune system changes which ‘prime the system’ to develop cardiovascular disease later in life.
In a sedentary office environment, participants working in 78° to 80°F temperatures consumed nearly 90 fewer calories than those in a cooler environment.
Epidemiologist Olivia Affuso studies new ways to prevent obesity and chronic disease through physical activity. She also volunteers with two groups that use running to help women and girls achieve fitness and personal goals.
Foods high in fats have long been put into the “unhealthy” category by nutrition experts, but UAB researchers believe this may have been all wrong, all along.
UAB School of Public Health research published in the journal Obesity shows seeing, hearing and smelling others’ eating foods can cause low birthweight in offspring among mice.
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