Displaying items by tag: school of medicine

The researcher says this proposal will analyze the novel concept that circadian disruption presents an additional challenge to mitochondrial function and liver health in the alcohol consumer.
Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of blindness in American adults. The source of this damage may lie in the belly — mainly a leaky small intestine. A novel treatment can possibly prevent or reverse this damage.
The study’s goal is to limit the toxic side effects common to many cancer therapies while not affecting their therapeutic benefits.
UAB Neurosurgery heads to local elementary schools to encourage young students to consider the STEM fields as they ponder career choices.
A new Biomedical Research and Psychology Building — made possible by a $76 million federal appropriation — received stage 1 approval from the UA System Board of Trustees.
Childhood cancer survivors with two genetic variations on the ROBO2 gene and who were treated with high doses of anthracycline treatment have a higher risk of developing cardiomyopathy.
UAB Hospital practice areas were honored with the “Best Hospital” designation, including cancer care, bariatric surgery, heart care, stroke care, minimally invasive surgery, comprehensive breast care, mammograms, obstetrics and women’s services.
Watching the portion and carb content of food and drinks can help prevent blood sugar spikes this New Year’s Eve.
The landmark precision medicine effort returns value to research participants by sharing tailored, actionable health-related reports.
The spinoff company, IN8bio Inc., uses proprietary drug-resistant immunotherapy licensed in part from UAB. Glioblastoma is the most aggressive type of cancer originating in the brain.
High-resolution knowledge of structure is a key link between viral biology and potential therapeutic use of the virus to quell bacterial infections.
Precision medicine approach may identify those at high genetic risk of hypertension, heart failure, stroke and heart attacks and use precision medicine to help prevent fatal cardiovascular diseases.
The study suggests that BMT survivors were more likely to be unable to afford basic necessities, and to defer medical care, in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.
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