Displaying items by tag: school of public health

Stephen Mennemeyer, Ph.D., received the Mental Health Policy and Economics Research Award from the International Center of Mental Health Policy and Economics.
A UAB School of Public Health professor was recently honored for her contributions in epidemiology.
The health officer for the Jefferson County Department of Health will present the annual State of Health in Jefferson County Address on April 2 at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.
According to the study, novel psychedelic use is rare, and the majority of people who reported using novel psychedelics were white men who were of college age or had recently graduated from college.
A recent study found that, while several interventions to improve the use of cholesterol-lowering medications have been implemented in the last decade, the percentage of adults taking statins regularly still remains low.
Masked hypertension occurs when people have normal blood pressure readings at the doctor’s office, but high blood pressure when measured outside of a clinical setting.
People of Mexican descent with variants of a certain gene are more at risk for Type 2 diabetes, but the risk of developing the disease does not increase for people of other Hispanic and Latino background groups.
A report by the American Heart Association found that 48 percent of U.S. adults live with some type of cardiovascular disease.
The scholars come from a range of backgrounds with various educational interests, including medicine, nursing, dentistry, pharmacology, social work and education.
SPRINT trial: Intensive lowering of blood pressure did not significantly reduce dementia risk but did have a measurable impact on mild cognitive impairment.
Ziad Kazzi, M.D., an emergency medicine physician and toxicologist, will present his lecture, Chemical Warfare Agents: Then and Now; Far and Near, on Jan. 31.
The first study to evaluate whether differences between men and women in the risk of stroke varies by race and age found that some risk factors were more important for white women than white men, but the risk factors for black women and black men had similar associations with stroke risk.  
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