Sloss Furnaces National Historic Park. Why do an internship? It's better to ask yourself why not. Employers look for experience when reading the resume of a potential employee. A recent college grad with one or two internships will be more attractive than one without that work experience. Employers know that internships give students hands-on experience with workplace skills, challenges, and environments—experiences that make those students valuable employees.

Internships give you the chance to try out a profession and collect references and professional contacts. You can also get course credit. If there's a downside to interning, we haven't heard about it.

Earn Credit Hours, Make Contacts, Get Involved

Public history internships are readily available for students with a 3.0 GPA at popular venues. Our students have interned at:

Others are available as well, and students are encouraged to take advantage of them in order to gain experience and make valuable professional connections. Contact the Director of Undergraduate Programs for more information.


  • David Hays (Class of 2021)

    Internship Spotlight

    David Hays Class of 2021

    A motorcyle on display at the Barber Motorsports Museum.I thoroughly enjoyed the UAB internship spent at the Barber Motorsports Museum. I was able to see the museum from several vantage points during my time there. The motorcycle enthusiast in saw the collection from a mechanical standpoint of engineering, artistry, and technology. The historian in me saw these items on display as a time capsule of eras long since gone and the people who made them great. The student in me was enthralled by the chance to research and learn about the people, places, and ideas that culminated in the amazing machines. The teacher in me was given the opportunity to share that gained knowledge with others in the form of my written words that are currently being used for some of the motorcycle “spotlights” on the Barber Museum website.

    Throughout this experience I was given seemingly unfettered access to the museum grounds, the archives, and most importantly, the staff and museum patrons willing to share their experiences, their memories, and their passion for motorsports, for they are ultimately, the reason for the success of the Barber Motorsports Museum.

  • Olivia Evans (Class of 2020)

    Internship Spotlight

    ""Olivia Evans Class of 2020

    During my internship at the Reynolds Finley Historical Library, I was able to gain an introduction to the broad field of library science. I participated in aiding with a collection development project concerning African Americans in healthcare, collaborated with a display about the Black Hospital Movement, observed instruction about book preservation, and much more.

    This experience strengthened and enriched essential qualities history majors possess such as researching, writing, critical thinking, and creativity. As a result of this internship, I was able to explore my greatest potential. 

  • Anna Kaetz (Class of 2022)

    Internship Spotlight

    Anna during her internship, standing on a ladder between library shelves.Anna Kaetz Class of 2022

    In January of 2015, I began an internship at the Reynolds Finley Historical Library. During my internship, I gained an appreciation for both the library profession and the opportunity to interact with rare, historical materials. This semester-long experience proved to be invaluable and was the first step towards my pursuit of a career in librarianship. My hope is that this career will allow me to help promote history and preserve historical materials for future generations.

  • Steve Filoromo (Class of 2020)

    Internship Spotlight

    Steve Filoromo Class of 2020

    A History Department student guiding school children through Sloss Furnaces. The ability to perform hands-on historical research and participate in public history education is by far one of my most treasured academic experiences. While historical research courses prepared me with a set of methodologies, researching and educating visitors at Sloss Furnaces National Historic Landmark helped me to realize a clear career path built around my interests in historical archaeology, public history, and civic engagement.

    During my time at Sloss, I aided with public interpretation for public and private tours, while also developing and researching historic industrial communities utilizing public and private records in Birmingham and field-based neighborhood surveys. This resulted in my article  "Mountains, Mines, and Quarters: Life, Labor, and the Sloss-Sheffield Steel & Iron Company, 1880-1950" (Vulcan Historical Review 24, 2020). Moreover, my internship helped me to develop an understanding of site-specific issues in historic preservation and public history.

    Photo credit: Ty Malugani