Displaying items by tag: oneal comprehensive cancer center

A new study confirms that G207, a genetically engineered virus developed at UAB, may be a beneficial therapy for brain tumors.

Bibb has been studying neuroendocrine cancer for almost 10 years and has published several reports in high-impact scientific journals.
Join the O’Neal Comprehensive Cancer Center at UAB for a fun night of fellowship, recognition and art to continue support for cancer research.

UAB Hospital practice areas were honored with the “Best Hospital” designation, including patient experience, bariatric surgery, obstetrics, minimally invasive surgery, stroke care, cancer care, breast care and women’s services.

At UAB, the company IN8bio Inc. is running a Phase I clinical trial to treat glioblastoma multiforme, the most aggressive type of cancer that originates in the brain.

UAB O’Neal Comprehensive Cancer Center, Morehouse School of Medicine and Tuskegee University collectively receive $18 million U54 grant from the National Cancer Institute.

A diagnosis of pancreatic cancer is devastating. But with the help of UAB, Steve Young is now cancer-free.

The largest registry of U.S. children with cancer who were diagnosed with COVID-19 found an increased risk of having severe infection and having their cancer therapy modified because of COVID, underscoring the urgency of vaccinations for these children, the authors say.

Young cancer survivors are at higher risk of developing subsequent HPV-related cancers than the general population, but less likely to receive the HPV vaccine. Findings from the first clinical trial of its kind support making HPV vaccination a routine part of oncologic care for all young cancer survivors, researchers say.

Treating blood disorders and cancers cannot be done alone. It requires the strong will of a patient, the support of family, and the compassion and expertise of a world-renowned health care team, like those with the O’Neal Comprehensive Cancer Center at UAB’s Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cell Therapy program.
Preclinical experiments show how to identify non-responding tumors and improve their response to immunotherapy, using two investigational new drugs that are permitted for human use. Physicians could immediately start investigational research in patients to test the effectiveness of this personalized approach.

Join UAB’s Dr. Mona Fouad to hear a discussion on implicit and explicit bias in the field of science and medicine. 

Because the beam of photons is so tightly focused, proton therapy has little effect on surrounding healthy tissue, making it especially beneficial for young patients.
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