Displaying items by tag: institute for cancer outcomes and survivorship

The largest registry of U.S. children with cancer who were diagnosed with COVID-19 found an increased risk of having severe infection and having their cancer therapy modified because of COVID, underscoring the urgency of vaccinations for these children, the authors say.

Young cancer survivors are at higher risk of developing subsequent HPV-related cancers than the general population, but less likely to receive the HPV vaccine. Findings from the first clinical trial of its kind support making HPV vaccination a routine part of oncologic care for all young cancer survivors, researchers say.

Blood and marrow transplantation strategies have changed significantly over the past four decades; but recipients still experience excess mortality that translates into 8.7 years of life lost, according to researchers in UAB’s Institute for Cancer Outcomes and Survivorship.

Record $95 million Heersink lead gift to advance strategic growth and biomedical innovation.
Tagged under
Women who had total body irradiation to prepare for blood or marrow transplantation before age 30 had a 4.5-fold increase in their risk of developing breast cancer later in life.
In the first study of its kind, researchers identified genetic factors that can lead to a decrease in cognitive ability after a blood or bone marrow transplant.
Findings indicated that sociodemographic disparities play a factor in whether all children are receiving high-quality and/or end-of-life care consistent with their goals.
National Cancer Institute award gives a UAB researcher the opportunity to develop programs that battle the long-term effects of treating childhood cancer.
A study regarding health risks in colorectal cancer patients may help develop personalized therapeutic options for patients with pre-existing morbidities.
UAB researchers have determined that recipients are likely to experience cognitive impairment in years following treatment.
The new UAB Breast Cancer Survivorship Clinic provides breast cancer patients extended follow-up care, helping them adjust to physical and emotional changes after treatment.