Displaying items by tag: release

An enthusiastic teacher and a fascinating topic lit his desire to learn. Now the veteran is building bone scaffolding with a three-dimensional bioprinter.
UAB, Alabama’s leader in precision medicine, joins with Huntsville’s HudsonAlpha in CSER2, an NIH project to bring genomic medicine to more children with birth defects or genetic disorders.
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The August issue of the journal focused on genomics in rheumatic diseases, the complex effort to understand the genetic underpinnings of more than 100 diseases that affect joints and muscles.
UAB Hospital continues to be highly ranked by U.S. News and World Report as the No. 1 hospital in Alabama and among the top in the Southeast and nation.
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UAB’s long-running study of cannabidiol reveals potential interactions between CBD and some commonly used anti-epileptic drugs.
With her 2-year-old granddaughter’s life in peril, 62-year-old Carol Graydon came to UAB to be tested as a living kidney donor — and was a perfect match.
Improvements in motor function and memory suggest human neurodevelopmental disorders may be amenable to treatment, even after onset of symptoms. According to a researcher, neurodevelopmental disorders with intellectual disability and autism may not need to last a lifetime.
Parents who listen to their children’s interests could help them be more successful and well-rounded in their extracurricular activities.
A UAB physician will co-chair a steering committee of global cystic fibrosis experts and clinical trial investigators to support the design, conduct and execution of the triple combination pivotal study program.
Even if you’ve previously rejected vaccinating your children or have neglected to do so, UAB physicians say it’s not too late to protect them against many preventable diseases.
The Alabama Genomic Health Initiative has begun full scale recruitment of interested participants at two sites in Birmingham.
UAB personalizes treatment for dry eye patients with the expansion of clinic and development of guidelines for diagnosis and treatment.
A UAB obstetric surgeon will lend her skills to African women by treating obstetric fistula, a common complication of childbirth in the developing world that causes incontinence.
The UAB study could help inform future health care management during early life and the development of interventions aimed at improving quality of life for older individuals.
This novel method improves purification of complex proteins by 10- to 500-fold, and it may aid both research and large-scale industrial production.
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