Displaying items by tag: informatics institute

Twelve teams competed for cash and prizes across two action-packed days in the AI Against Cancer hackathon. This is the third iteration of the UAB-sponsored event, which applies big data and artificial intelligence techniques to fight disease.

This year, the university recognizes 50 years of service by Jeanne Hutchison, Ph.D., and Ferdinand Urthaler, M.D., and 45 years of service by Robert Kim M.D., and Joseph Lovetto. In addition, 294 employees with 20 or more years and 904 with five, 10 and 15 years will honored for their longevity.

Responding to a challenge like none other, investigators made crucial discoveries, developed new treatments and went above and beyond to serve the campus community and beyond.

Perhaps no industry was altered quite as much as education during the COVID-19 pandemic. All across campus, Blazers worked together to bring the best of UAB into remote learning and ensure students could still receive an exceptional education experience even in rapidly changing circumstances.

Learn how UAB bioinformaticist Jake Chen, Ph.D., and computer scientist Da Yan, Ph.D., shifted their venerable gathering online and aided the fight against COVID-19.

This summer’s COVID-19 Data Science Hackathon spurred many creative applications and several ongoing projects, including an automated genomic epidemiology pipeline and a machine-learning based viral transmission simulator.

Cheaha now is certified for use with protected health information, including medical records and genomic data, which investigators describe as a “big deal.”

Just in time to tackle COVID-19, the Informatics Institute launches a bigger, more capable version of its team-science data platform.

Investigators attract major grants to use AI on failed drug trials, cell-free DNA and puzzling CT scans.

Single-cell sequencing enables researchers to study disease as never before — even skipping through time to follow crucial populations. UAB experts explain what all the fuss is about and how to get started in single-cell research — a field that is wide open for discovery.

Investigators can access secure, high-volume file storage, a pipeline for clinical data and the high-performance computing resources to analyze it.