Career Development

Graphic of two businessmen talking with interlocking speech bubbles.

One of our main focus areas in the Master of Engineering with a concentration in Information Engineering Management (IEM) at UAB, is helping students grow in their professional careers, moving from engineer to manager, but seeing the transforming impact of our curriculum in the lives and careers of our students and alumni isn't a terrible outcome either.

Graphic of two businessmen talking with interlocking speech bubbles.

The biggest problems faced by the engineers and technology leaders are not about technology at all. As we talk about in the Master of Engineering with a concentration in Information Engineering Management (IEM) at UAB, the barriers we create as people in the workplace are the main issue. Most technology workers, or just people in general, are not prepared to deal with the challenges people bring.

Most potential students that are considering applying for the Masters of Engineering with a concentration in Information Engineering Management (IEM) at UAB already have years of experience in a technical field - but they are also looking for something more. While they share similar technical skills, the diverse dreams and goals they have for themselves moving forward gives our IEM classes a different kind of authenticity. Our students are taking what they're learning in class and actively applying it in their current workplaces, their five year plans to go from engineer to manager, or even to bolster their entrepreneurial spirit to start new companies.

One person standing out in a crowd of many people dressed in suits.

Entrepreneurship is a hot topic these days. The ability to start up a personal website, get a small business loan, and use social media to promote your creations have made it easier than ever to chase the dream of being your own boss. There's even a long-running reality TV show dedicated to the people willing to take a risk supporting themselves with a unique invention or idea. 

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Many of the clients in the Masters of Engineering with a concentration in Information Engineering Management (IEM) are looking for positions in leadership in their current company, but some are also looking to move to other companies or even venture into entrepreneurship, which may be the ultimate leadership gig. 

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Communicating has never been easier than it is today. Between texting, email, and even video calling, we can get in touch with each other better and faster now than ever before. However, as we discuss in the Masters of Engineering with a concentration in Information Engineering Management (IEM) at UAB, the advancements in communication also bring some interesting hurdles along with it. 

An employee talking to her boss.

One of the secrets to a successful career is being able to cooperate with a variety of people, and one of the most important relationships you will have in the workplace is the one with your boss. Having clear definition of responsibilities and open lines of communication with your supervisor can be the difference in having a rewarding place of work, or waking up dreading to go to your office every morning. 

Plan, action, and success street signs.

As we wrap up the final days of 2018 and begin a new year, many people take time to think about New Year's resolution ideas and goals to accomplish in 2019. While resolutions are a great way to look toward the new year with optimism, if you're like most people, that also means seeing those same resolutions fly out the window before January is over (if you're lucky).

Man writing tips on white board in presentation to group.

So you want to become a leader? Are you sitting back and thinking about what actions you need to take to become one? Maybe it feels like some kind of secret mission – where you must uncover the hidden secrets of becoming a leader.

Two colleagues brainstorming with sticky notes.

When we started developing the curriculum for the Masters of Engineering degree with a concentration in Information Engineering Management we asked ourselves - what exactly should a leader really look like? Our brainstorming eventually led us to the question - what can our curriculum teach leaders to do better? We came up with several key answers, but project management was among the most important.