Displaying items by tag: department of medicine

UAB vaccine demographic numbers holding steady as Center Point vaccination site preps for Friday, March 19, opening.
Alabama and the Southeast have high rates of kidney disease, especially in minority populations. On World Kidney Day, physicians have a chance to shine a light on this troublesome disease.
UAB will now operate three community vaccination sites — two downtown and one in Hoover — in an effort to distribute the COVID-19 vaccine to more people.
Research found that gaining community members’ perspectives to identify barriers and facilitators to COVID-19, related to prevention, coping and testing, may potentially improve outcomes.
“These vaccines are our way out of the epidemic, and we want to do all we can to help get Alabama out of this as quickly as possible,” said Sarah Nafziger, M.D.
The vaccine most likely does not prevent spread of the virus, but probably does reduce the length of time an infected person sheds virus.
With misinformation about COVID-19 vaccines rife, turn to trusted medical professionals at UAB’s Department of Medicine for the straight dope.
The 72-year-old patient was unable to mount her own immune defense against the SARS-CoV-2 virus because of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, which compromises normal immunity and immunoglobulin production.
Use of the diabetes drug metformin — before a diagnosis of COVID-19 — was associated with a threefold decrease in mortality in COVID-19 patients with Type 2 diabetes.
At UAB Hospital, the term “COVID convalesced” is used when a patient is no longer considered infectious to others and can be moved out of a COVID-specific care unit, but is still sick and requires intensive medical attention.
The O’Neal Comprehensive Cancer Center at UAB will hold its 36th annual and first-ever virtual ArtBLINK Gala on Friday, Feb. 5, featuring an online art auction of 20 original pieces from local artists to support cancer research.
Observational clinical research of COVID-19 patients can help clinicians better understand how the previously unknown SARS-CoV-2 virus acts, and findings from this research can better inform treatment and vaccine design.
This potential preventive treatment for Crohn’s disease was tested on a mouse model and on immune-reactive T cells from patients with Crohn’s disease.
As the first FDA-approved COVID-19 vaccine begins to be administered, many Americans still have questions. UAB has you covered.
The study examined trends in mortality due to chronic lower respiratory disease and investigated disparities in deaths due to CLRD between rural and urban areas across the United States.
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