Displaying items by tag: neuroscience

With the number of Americans with dementia expected to increase dramatically, UAB’s new brain health clinics point the way to improving brain health over a lifespan.
The distinct cell populations were identified by single-nucleus RNA sequencing of 21,600 cells of the rat ventral tegmental area, located in the midbrain.
The investigational drug masitinib appears to inhibit parts of the immune system that may be overactive in ALS.
The fields of neuroengineering and brain-computer interfaces could have a tremendous impact on a number of neurologic conditions, such as stroke, neurodegenerative disorders, Parkinson’s disease, dementia and other brain diseases.
UAB’s new intraoperative MRI suite allows for real time magnetic resonance imaging during surgical procedures.
The prestigious program aims to make study abroad experiences accessible to a more diverse population of students and prepare them to assume leadership roles in government and the private sector.
Modeled on the state’s trauma system, the Alabama Statewide Stroke System will help improve emergency response for stroke patients.
Gryshyna will use the prize money she received to advance her research on pain management techniques for HIV patients.

The PPMI study is looking for biomarkers for Parkinson’s disease, which would help identify those at risk and track the progression of the disease.

The grant links researchers from different disciplines, institutions and locations to study basic mechanisms that contribute to Parkinson’s disease.

UAB’s Standaert elected vice president of a leading neurological professional organization.

Limiting neuroinflammation may represent a promising new approach to treat neurological diseases driven by neuroinflammation, such as stroke, spinal cord injury and neuropathic pain.
Six graduate students in the Academic Medical Center of the 21st Century scholarship program will network with medical professionals, train with top research doctors and receive research funding from the UAB School of Medicine. 
Seth Hubbard, a UAB undergraduate student studying neuroscience, has received a grant to test the efficacy of carvedilol as a treatment for retinal degeneration, while participating in a summer research fellowship with Fight for Sight.
New results suggest the answer is no, implying that the role of tau in the pathogenesis of Lewy body dementias is distinct from Alzheimer’s disease.
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