Displaying items by tag: neuroscience

Alabama Interagency Autism Coordinating Council has established regional networks throughout Alabama to centralize resources for those with autism spectrum disorder, and for their families.
A mechanism through which circadian clocks in neurons encode external daily rhythms of excitability allows pacesetter neurons to communicate with the rest of the body via electrical impulses, with possible implications in understanding and treating mood disorders.
A UAB study will test whether training to modify care-resistant behavior can improve quality of life for family caregivers of dementia patients.
UAB and Auburn will team up for a study of magnetic resonance imaging techniques that could enhance epilepsy surgery.
Isabella Mak of Dothan and Eli Ussery of Columbus, Georgia, have been named Mr. and Ms. UAB, and Lakshmi Subramani of Madison and Daniel Alejandro Mendoza of Hattiesburg, Mississippi, were named first alternates.
UAB investigators have won a prestigious White House BRAIN Initiative grant to study the potential benefits of new technology coupled with newly discovered biomarkers in deep brain stimulation for Parkinson’s disease.
Learning how sensory organs in the skin work may solve sensory disorders, including pain seen in inflammation, diabetes and cancer treatment.

UAB and partners launch the PREVeNT study, aimed at preventing the onset of seizures in children with tuberous sclerosis.

A UAB study that is the first of its kind found that a tiny RNA — miR-124-3p — appears to play a role in producing major depression. 

This NIH-funded conference is part of UAB’s effort to engage and retain neuroscience graduate students from underrepresented ethnic and racial groups across the United States.

UAB-developed technology supports a globe-spanning partnership that links pediatric neurosurgeons at UAB and Children’s of Alabama with those in Vietnam to enhance epilepsy care for Vietnamese children.

For a second summer, Maria Onatunde traveled to UAB from Florida to participate in UAB's PARAdiGM program, which offers in-depth research experience for undergraduates from disadvantaged and minority backgrounds.
Altered excitability is seen in brain neurons in epilepsy, depression, drug addiction and other disorders, and this discovery may offer a potential therapeutic target.
Researchers have found that an interaction between a mutant gene and alpha synuclein in neurons leads to hallmark pathologies seen in Parkinson’s disease, findings that may lead to new mechanisms and targets for neuroprotection.
Results show that JAK/STAT pathway inhibitors may be a new class of therapeutic treatments for patients with Parkinson’s disease. Acting by reducing inflammation, they prevent neurodegeneration in animal models and may be an important new approach to slow progression of the disease.
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