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The new On Demand platform from IT Research Computing lets anyone tap into the power of Cheaha “the easy way.”

In this unique network, community clinicians and clinical scientists are expanding the knowledge base for clinical decision-making and moving the latest findings into routine care.

An endowed scholarship fund honoring a founder of UAB’s ALS program will help undergraduates such as Yuri Kwon — set to present her work to the American Academy of Neurology in May — take part in groundbreaking research.

What can you do with a gene-editing tool like CRISPR? Laura Lambert, Ph.D., who builds one-of-a-kind models in UAB’s transgenic core facility, gives the lowdown along with researchers who took her heavily attended CRISPR workshop.

Lack of access to care is the biggest contributor to Alabama’s health woes and technology offers a solution, according to the REACH project, a finalist in the UAB Grand Challenge.

The Alabama HOPE Project, a Grand Challenge finalist, would bring change through education, health and economic opportunity, starting in Birmingham and Marengo County.

What does a smart, sustainable city look like in the 21st century? This Grand Challenge proposal would create a large-scale testbed for new approaches in technology, policy and sustainability in Birmingham to prove best practices to be used by cities throughout Alabama, the United States and the world.

Chris Brown, vice president for research, says broad-based research, effective community engagement and societal acceptance of the solutions are needed make headway against the grand challenges Americans face.

Investigators can access secure, high-volume file storage, a pipeline for clinical data and the high-performance computing resources to analyze it.

The College of Arts and Sciences awarded $30,000 each to Jeff Morris, Magda Szaflarski and Zina Trost to fund projects that foster connections, ask big questions and find big solutions.

The UAB Gout CORT Enrichment Series has been canceled for May 22. Information on rescheduling will be provided as it is available.
Direct questions to Tammi Floyd Thomas at tamms@uab.edu.
Lawrence Sincich, Ph.D., received a $1.81 million NIH National Eye Institute award for work that will lead to better understanding of color perception in the brain.
UAB investigators are studying the long-term benefits and risks of four widely used diabetes drugs in combination with metformin, the most common first-line medication for treating type 2 diabetes. Recruitment of volunteers for the project, called the Glycemia Reduction Approaches in Diabetes: A Comparative Effectiveness (GRADE) Study, begins in June.

Applications for NORC pilot feasibility studies are due April 10.

UAB's David Sweatt will be the first molecular neurobiologist in the U.S. to investigate Pitt- Hopkins syndrome, a disorder characterized by intellectual disability and developmental delays, which can range from moderate to severe.

Physical work makes us tired at the end of the day, but what about problem-solving?

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