Displaying items by tag: cas research

PEER-BUDS will counter COVID disruptions and school inequity by prepping 24 new biology majors with skills crucial to success in the lab and classroom. Another perk of the program, which runs Aug. 1-19: a $1,500 stipend.
After undergraduates in introductory biology courses talked with an epidemiologist and a physician specializing in infectious diseases, 60% who initially said they would not get vaccinated had changed their minds.

A civil rights field experience, safer MRI scans, investigating college stress and implementing a massive genetic test for cancer: Recipients of 2022 Faculty Development Grant Program awards explain how they will use their funds.

Writing a book isn’t easy, but faculty in the College of Arts and Sciences produced more than a dozen in 2021. Thirteen faculty from eight departments wrote books on rhetoric and the Dead Sea Scrolls, pandemic bioethics, medical epigenetics, world politics and more.

With a CAREER award from the National Science Foundation and innovative genetic techniques, UAB algal expert Stacy Krueger-Hadfield, Ph.D., is uncovering clues to the success of a coastal ecosystem engineer.
With a prestigious NSF CAREER grant, physicist Cheng-Chien Chen, Ph.D., is working on a problem that could lead to a new generation of electronics — and giving UAB students a front-row seat to the action.
Humanities and social sciences unite to build an app that brings to life the struggles faced by former offenders in order to make the case for change. The project was made possible by funding from the College of Arts and Sciences’ Interdisciplinary Team Proposal program.
Researchers explore how to help budding scientists fall in love with a field that is incredibly important but can be “very overwhelming” to start.

Jake Chen, Ph.D., associate director of the Informatics Institute, is the first ACM member in Alabama to be honored as a Distinguished Member in this category.

UAB computer scientists are contributing to a DARPA-funded initiative with artificial intelligence-based programming languages that allow humans to understand the “safety and correctness of code in the wild.”
Lindsay Brainard, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Philosophy, delves into the tools modern scientists use to generate new hypotheses in biology, medicine, astronomy — and philosophy.
Teaira McMurtry, Ph.D., assistant professor in the School of Education, is using funding from the UAB Faculty Development Grants Program to provide Alabama teachers with tools, strategies and lesson plans to understand the power of Black language.
Projects selected for the UAB Faculty Development Grants Program offer an intriguing look into the creativity and range of research and scholarship on campus.

Neurobiology Professor Robin Lester, Ph.D., winner of the Ellen Gregg Ingalls Award/UAB NAS Award for Lifetime Achievement in Teaching, has distinguished himself at the bench and in the classroom.

With a new NSF grant, computer scientists are developing a precision flood prediction system that pushes the boundaries of the young field of geometric deep learning. Their work could lead to better route recommendations in navigation apps and breakthroughs in drug discovery and development of novel, energy-efficient materials.
Research on financial stress following the Great Recession finds that people who were in debt at midlife had a 90 percent increase in being diagnosed with a psychiatric disorder.

How can leaders create a workplace where “how things really get done” matches “how things should get done”? Two experts in industrial-organizational psychology — Kecia Thomas, Ph.D., dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, and C. Allen Gorman, Ph.D., chair of the Department of Management, Information Systems and Quantitative Methods — offer five ways to make it happen.

UAB will be a statewide hub for developing a new generation of components for spacecraft, power plants and biomedical implants thanks to crush- and corrosion-resistant spark plasma sintering technology.

Fear and self-loathing play a role in conditions from cancer to HIV and COVID-19, spurring a flood of new NIH funding for stigma research. This summer, UAB researchers led — and participated in — a first-of-its-kind “crash course” to bring more investigators into the field.
With a $1 million-plus grant from the National Science Foundation, Shahid and Karolina Mukhtar, associate professors in the Department of Biology, will use machine learning to identify new ways to boost crop production and train high school science teachers in cutting-edge gene studies.
Yuliang Zheng, Ph.D., chair of the Department of Computer Science, explains the key words, career paths, titles and salaries of jobs in data science fields.

Social Work’s Colleen Fisher will examine microfinance as a way to alleviate poverty among vulnerable women in low-resource countries, and Art and Art History Associate Professor Cathleen Cummings will study and map temples from the Bhosle dynasty of Nagpur, India.

In his latest book, “Pandemic Bioethics,” philosophy Professor Greg Pence, Ph.D., examines allocation of scarce medical resources, immunity passports, vaccines, discrimination and more. It is available as an e-book now and will be in print June 18.

An AI model created by faculty in CAS and Engineering analyzes driving performance in seconds instead of hours — and could eventually teach new drivers to drive well.

Pilot funds enable cross-campus collaborations focused on mobility with disabilities and older caregivers with HIV.

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