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Assistant Professor Noha Sharafeldin, MBBCh, Ph.D., presented cancer-related findings from the massive N3C database of records from COVID-positive patients at 55 institutions nationwide, including UAB. Results — including a significant increase in risk of death among patients who recently had chemotherapy — were published simultaneously in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices are at risk for complications when undergoing heart surgery. UAB’s multi-disciplinary team is creating a platform to train anesthesiologists to help.

An AI model created by faculty in CAS and Engineering analyzes driving performance in seconds instead of hours — and could eventually teach new drivers to drive well.

The Faculty Development Program supports junior faculty as they explore research initiatives, creative works, publications and presentations.

Could a low-sugar diet overcome insulin issues and a lifetime of weight struggles? That’s the question being studied by Barbara Gower, Ph.D., in a five-year, $1.9 million study.

Clinical trial results published this year are better than any other medication and have study scientists excited, including UAB’s Timothy Garvey, M.D. Get the latest on what Garvey calls “a very powerful tool to treat obesity.”

Responding to a challenge like none other, investigators made crucial discoveries, developed new treatments and went above and beyond to serve the campus community and beyond.

Pilot funds enable cross-campus collaborations focused on mobility with disabilities and older caregivers with HIV.

By holiday season 2020, Assistant Professor Ellen Eaton, M.D., was almost ready to give up pursuing research funding and focus solely on patient care. She took one more shot, which paid off with two major new grants.

As UAB hosts screenings of a highly praised documentary on women scientists, meet several pioneers on campus.

Constraint-Induced Therapy, developed at UAB and used worldwide to help patients regain function after stroke, will be tested as therapy for patients with cognitive difficulties following COVID-19 infection.

Research led by Professor Christina Rodriguez, Ph.D., documents increase in abuse risk and psychological aggression following the economic devastation, isolation and school closures brought on by the pandemic.

In keynote addresses at UAB’s COVID-19 Research Symposium, Anthony Fauci, M.D., and Kathleen Neuzil, M.D., shared the latest science on how COVID-19 spreads and the safety and efficacy of vaccines in late-stage trials.

With his idea for a coil that travels through the vasculature much like a sailboat riding the breeze, a UAB neuroradiologist has earned a commercialization grant from the U.S. Economic Development Administration.

Learn how UAB bioinformaticist Jake Chen, Ph.D., and computer scientist Da Yan, Ph.D., shifted their venerable gathering online and aided the fight against COVID-19.

A faculty member in the School of Health Professions turns his own experiences running research projects into a vision for a comprehensive, automated digital solution with the help of funding from the U.S. Economic Development Administration.

With funding from UAB’s urgent COVID-19 research grants, researchers are testing penehyclidine to halt the acute respiratory distress syndrome seen in seriously ill patients by defending crucial cell barriers.

A novel detergent-like compound developed by UAB researchers that blocks HIV and HSV viruses from entering cells could have the same effect against the virus that causes COVID-19. The team is exploring the compound’s potential with a commercialization grant from the U.S. Economic Development Administration.

Colleagues explain say retiring Animal Resources Program Director Samuel Cartner, DVM, Ph.D., has helped shape the institution’s research.

Benjamin Larimer, Ph.D., has received a five-year, $1.5-million New Innovator Award grant to develop a PET imaging test that identifies patients most likely to benefit from immunotherapy.

Using extensive testing, diagnosis and clinical data from across the Deep South, this project will be the first to analyze multiple dimensions of inequality to clarify contributions to COVID-19 disparities.

ScopeAssist, invented by a physician and an engineer, is designed to help surgeons deal with the rigors associated with endoscopic surgeries.

Doctors don’t have anything to reliably collect urine from neonates. A solution to this problem earned a commercialization grant from the U.S. Economic Development Administration.

The vaccine pipeline rests largely on a single tree in Chile. A sustainable, cost-effective solution from this UAB chemist earned him a commercialization grant from the U.S. Economic Development Administration.

Most PPE goes on the provider, not the patient. A solution to this problem from UAB faculty earned them a commercialization grant from the U.S. Economic Development Administration.

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