Professor
email
Humanities Building 221
(205) 934-8594

Research and Teaching Interests: Shakespeare, Animal Studies, Sexuality, Feminism, Masculinity, Harry Potter

Rebecca Ann Bach. Office Hours: By appointment

Education:
  • PhD, University of Pennsylvania

Rebecca Ann Bach is Professor of English, specializing in Shakespeare and Renaissance Drama. She is the author of Shakespeare and Renaissance Literature before Heterosexuality (Palgrave, 2007) and Colonial Transformations: The Cultural Production of the New Atlantic World 1580-1640 (Palgrave, 2000). With Gwynne Kennedy, she co-edited Feminisms and Early Modern Texts: Essays for Phyllis Rackin (Susquehanna University Press, 2010).

Dr. Bach has published many articles on Shakespeare, Renaissance drama, animals, sexuality, masculinity, and race. Her essay “Falstaff Becomes the (Hu)man at the Expense of The Merry Wives of Windsor” was published in The Merry Wives of Windsor: New Critical Essays, Evelyn Gajowski and Phyllis Rackin, eds. (Routledge, 2014).

Dr. Bach has served as the English Department’s Undergraduate Director and Director of Honors. She has won the University’s Ireland Award for Scholarly Distinction (2011), Exceptional Innovator’s Award (2011), and Outstanding Faculty Advisor Award (2006). As Associate Dean, she recently coordinated and ran the College of Arts and Sciences’ 2013 Civil Rights Commemorative celebrations.

  • Harry Potter: Ethics and the Imagination
  • Shakespeare for High School Teachers
  • Shakespeare: Page and Stage
  • Animal Studies/Animality Studies
Books:
Book Chapters:
  • “Falstaff Becomes the (Hu)man at the Expense of The Merry Wives of Windsor,” in The Merry Wives of Windsor: New Critical Essays, Evelyn Gajowski and Phyllis Rackin, eds. (Routledge, 2014).
  • “Foreign Travel and Exploration,” in Ben Jonson in Context, Julie Sanders, ed. (Cambridge University Press, 2010): 263-70.
  • “The ‘Peerless’ Macbeth: Friendship and Family in Macbeth," in Macbeth: New Critical Essays, Nick Moschovakis, ed. (Routledge, 2008) 104-17.

Articles:
  • “The Animal Continuum in A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” Textual Practice 24 (No. 1, 2010): 123-47.
  • “(Re)placing John Donne in the History of Sexuality,” ELH 72 (2005): 259-89.
  • “Tennis Balls: Henry V and Testicular Masculinity, or, According to the OED, Shakespeare Doesn’t Have Any Balls” Renaissance Drama 30 (2001): 3-23.
  • University’s Ireland Award for Scholarly Distinction, 2011
  • Exceptional Innovator’s Award, 2011
  • Outstanding Faculty Advisor Award, 2006