Displaying items by tag: department of neurosurgery

UAB’s newest members of the prestigious National Academy of Medicine were selected for their outstanding professional achievements and exceptional commitment to service.
The study will examine a protein that may help slow bleeding in the brain when given within a two-hour window following the first signs of hemorrhage.
The new technique to predict seizure clusters could, if confirmed, have a profound impact on patients with drug-resistant epilepsy who are prone to seizure clusters. 
An aneurysm is a bulge in a blood vessel caused by a weakness in the blood vessel wall, resulting in an increase of pressure in a small area and causing the vessel to balloon.
For one UAB employee, having a nephew compete in The World Games makes Birmingham’s and UAB’s support of the games come full circle.
Medical professionals are calling on the World Health Assembly to pass a resolution calling for folic acid fortification in staple foods to prevent spina bifida worldwide.
Radiofrequency ablation precisely delivers heat energy that can destroy lesions within the brain that are the cause of seizures.
The fields of neuroengineering and brain-computer interfaces could have a tremendous impact on a number of neurologic conditions, such as stroke, neurodegenerative disorders, Parkinson’s disease, dementia and other brain diseases.
The grant will fund research surrounding next-generation human models that could potentially aid in the development of treatment for glioblastoma.
UAB’s new intraoperative MRI suite allows for real time magnetic resonance imaging during surgical procedures.

At UAB, the company IN8bio Inc. is running a Phase I clinical trial to treat glioblastoma multiforme, the most aggressive type of cancer that originates in the brain.

The new grant links UAB researchers with colleagues at two other institutions to search for ways to advance therapies from bench to bedside.
Record $95 million Heersink lead gift to advance strategic growth and biomedical innovation.
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A small molecule inhibitor has been identified that reduces the growth of uveal melanoma, a rare and deadly cancer of the eye.
G207, an immunotherapy derived from a modified herpes virus is well tolerated in children with gliomas, and shows signs of clinical effectiveness
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