Displaying items by tag: department of neurosurgery

G207, an immunotherapy derived from a modified herpes virus is well tolerated in children with gliomas, and shows signs of clinical effectiveness
The study points to an adhesive cell surface protein that might be a key element in tackling the resistance to radiation therapy commonly seen in glioblastoma tumors.
James Markert, M.D., MPH, the James Garber Galbraith Endowed Chair of Neurosurgery at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, is the president-elect of the American Academy of Neurological Surgery for 2020-2021.
With misinformation about COVID-19 vaccines rife, turn to trusted medical professionals at UAB’s Department of Medicine for the straight dope.
Migraine headaches were ruining Christopher Sheheane’s life, until a visit to UAB found the cause: a pituitary gland tumor.
Physicians say it is crucial for trainees to have role models and mentors who have shared experiences.
This is thought to be the first time that information found via artificial intelligence has led to a clinical trial.

Case studies show five people who found better treatments for neuropsychiatric symptoms from data collected while patients were at home.

UAB surgeons removed a rare pituitary gland tumor from a Cullman woman that had defied diagnosis for years.
This new, non-invasive way to deliver radiation has helped one Alabama man complete optometry school and launch his new career.
Deep brain stimulation has long been used to treat Parkinson’s disease, and was approved for use in epilepsy late in 2018.
A UAB surgeon has received the Congress of Neurological Surgeons’ most prestigious award.
UAB will fill a gap in the stroke belt as it joins StrokeNet, a national research consortium.
The goal is an early warning system to block incipient seizures for patients where medications have failed.
Early results for a UAB-developed viral immunotherapy to treat brain tumors in children demonstrate safety and tolerability in Phase I studies.
The dying cells send signals to recipient tumor cells to increase aggressiveness, motility, and resistance to radiation or chemotherapy.
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