Placement

For new students who are not transferring credit from another institutions, your composition placement is based upon your ACT English score or Advanced Placement Credit. The test scores for placement are listed below:

ACT Scores

  • ACT English score of 20 or above — EH 101 and 102.
  • ACT English score of 19 or below — EH 106/096L and 107/097L. All students complete a first day essay to ensure their placement is accurate.

Advanced Placement Credit

  • AP English score of 4 or above — credit for EH 101.
  • AP English score of 5 — credit for EH 101 and EH 102.

TOEFL/IELTS Writing Subscores

  • TOEFL Writing Subscore:
    • 16-22 — EH 108 and 109.
    • 23 or above — EH 101 and 102.
  • IELTS Writing Subscore:
    • 5.5-6.0 — EH 108 and 109.
    • 6.5 or above — EH 101 and 102.

Transfer Credit

Students who have taken Freshman Composition courses at a different college or university may be eligible to transfer credit for EH101 and/or 102 at UAB. If the student has taken Composition at any of the schools listed by the Alabama Articulation and General Studies Committee, which includes most two and four year institutions in the state, their credit for the qualifying course (EH 101 or EH 102) should be automatically granted.

Students attempting to transfer credit for Composition courses taken at colleges or universities outside of the state or outside of the Alabama Articulation Agreement should speak with their academic advisor, who will contact the Director of Freshman English about the possibility of transferring credit for these courses.

Courses

Freshman composition courses include the following.

EH 101: English Composition I

EH 101 focuses on analytical writing and the development of effective writing processes, with special attention to critical reading, revision, and writing for academic audiences. Students’ rhetorical knowledge is fostered through instruction in purpose-driven writing and the rhetorical moves of academic writing in the university. Students develop critical thinking, reading, and writing capacities through instruction in strategies of textual analysis, analysis of multiple genres and mediums of communication, and through analytical writing assignments that challenge them to think critically about the meanings and implications of persuasive texts. Like all UAB Freshman English courses, EH 101 promotes the development of students’ writing processes through an emphasis on revision throughout the course. Students learn to see writing as a process and develop critical strategies for invention or developing ideas, drafting, revising, and editing their work. Knowledge of the conventions of academic writing is promoted through instruction in the use of sources, academic argumentation, and academic genres.

EH 102: English Composition II

EH 102 focuses on argumentation for academic and public audiences, with a particular emphasis upon academic research. Students develop rhetorical knowledge through analysis of various genres and their persuasive strategies, as well as through instruction in argumentation. Students’ Critical Thinking, Reading, and Writing is fostered through instruction in academic research and critical reading of academic sources, as well as through instruction in writing for varying audiences, purposes, and contexts, and in different genres and mediums. Students develop important writing processes through an emphasis on revision throughout the course, which includes writing workshops for each individual project, as well as significant revisions of two essays. Students’ metacognitive understanding of their writing processes is also facilitated through a reflective argument on the development of their writing throughout the course. Knowledge of conventions is developed through instruction in citation practices for both print and visual texts, analysis of multiple genres and mediums of communication, and through workshops, instructor and peer response, and direct instruction.

EH 106/096L: Introduction to Freshman Writing I

EH 106/096L are designed to tap into students’ knowledge, experiences, and abilities as writers in order to help them gain confidence writing for an entirely new community—the university. Students find that this course is neither a lecture course nor a drills and skills course but a course where they can develop their abilities as a writer by writing, getting feedback from other writers, and revising. A key part of becoming a stronger writer is learning how to use feedback. This is why EH 106 has an additional writing studio, EH 096L, attached to the class. In addition to meeting with the EH 106 class, students meet once a week with their writing studio and visit the University Writing Center eight times during the semester. Their weekly writing studio and meetings with writing center tutors give students fresh perspectives on their work and strategies for revision. Ultimately, the goal of EH 106 is to empower students as writers and to enable them to find confidence in their voice and use their voice to engage in the important conversations that shape university and public life.

EH 107/097L: Introduction to Freshman Writing II

EH 107/097L builds on students’ development as writers in EH 106/096 by challenging students to choose and define a research project they feel passionate about and to communicate the importance of their project and ideas to a variety of different audiences. EH 107/097 seeks to tap into students’ power as a writer by placing their own ideas in conversation with the ideas of others. The course does this by immersing students not only in research but also in the process of expressing their ideas and arguments for a variety of audiences. Like EH 106/096, students will meet once a week with their classmates in a writing studio session and visit the University Writing Center eight times during the semester. The weekly writing studio and meetings with writing center tutors give students fresh perspectives on their work and strategies for revision. Ultimately, students’ experience in EH 107/097 will enable them to not only be an informed writer but also an adaptive writer, one who can use their voice to not only write effective research papers but also to engage in the life of their communities and work for the public good.

EH 108: English Composition I for Second Language Writers

EH 108 supports the writing and revision processes of second language writers. EH 108 follows the same curriculum and pursues the same goals of EH 101 and provides the same course credit as EH 101. Students work with faculty who are experienced teaching second language writers. While EH 108 follows the same curriculum and achieves the same goals as EH 101, more time is given in the course to foster students’ understanding of writing in different genres, cultural contexts, and for a variety of different audiences. Ultimately, the goal of EH 108 is to build on the important literacies and knowledge that multilingual and international students bring to our classrooms and to provide an environment that supports their growing confidence as writers.

EH 109: English Composition II for Second Language Writers

EH 109 builds on the skills of analytical and academic writing developed in EH 108 in by fostering the research writing processes of second language writers. EH 109 introduces vital research processes and information literacy skills, as well as challenging students to write in a variety of genres and mediums for a variety of audiences. EH 109 follows the same curriculum and pursues the same goals as EH 102. Students work with faculty who are experienced teaching research writing to second language writers. Significant time is given to helping students analyze the contexts of academic research and writing, as well as the contexts of writing for a variety of public audiences. Ultimately, EH 109 seeks to give students effective practices of academic research, confidence in writing with sources, and the rhetorical knowledge to communicate their research and writing to a variety of audiences.