Displaying items by tag: department of medicine

UAB Hospital practice areas were honored with the “Best Hospital” designation, including cancer care, heart care, stroke care, minimally invasive surgery, comprehensive breast care, mammograms, obstetrics and women’s services.
A UAB expert is offering some of their top tips on how to avoid holiday heart syndrome and enjoy a heart-healthy holiday season.
Sickle cell disease is the most common and clinically significant inherited blood disorder across the nation, and now there is an FDA-approved gene therapy to help those living with SCD.
Tuberculosis, the world’s leading infectious disease killer, caused 1.6 million deaths in 2021, along with 10 million new cases of tuberculosis every year.
One UAB experts says the roles of screenings, warning signs and a healthy lifestyle are all keys to cancer prevention.
After a loved one receives a breast cancer diagnosis or surgery, it is important for caregivers and support partners to know how they can best help the patient during the difficult time.
The academy provides a forum where knowledge and skills are developed and refined to support community leaders as they conduct planning and improvement projects, balance needs and resources, and secure funding that ignites change.
Analysis of a survey of 18,041 people in rural KwaZulu-Natal revealed a discrepancy between the ability of the South African health system to respond to the health needs of people with communicable diseases and the health needs of people with non-communicable diseases.
Lung-resident memory B cells produced during influenza are long-living immune cells that migrate to the lungs from draining lymph nodes and lie in wait as early responders that can quickly react to future infections. They are key sentinels against subsequent viral variants.
UAB researchers make a case for utilizing telehealth technologies in the care of injured rural patients stating that teletrauma can improve access to trauma care for rural patients.
Since 1985, the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults study has examined the factors that contribute to the development of cardiovascular disease to better understand the natural history of cardiovascular disease over the adult life course.
These results add an additional, mechanistic aspect to further explain how the decades-old blood pressure medication verapamil can preserve beta cell function in Type 1 diabetes patients by affecting the hormone insulin-like growth factor 1.
The study, funded by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, will compare two pathways of post-fracture patient care.
Some PD-1+CXCR5+CD4+ T cells will become germinal center-Tfh cells that are essential for B cells to become high-affinity antibody-producing cells. Others do not take that path, instead becoming memory T cells.
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