Reporter Staff

Reporter Staff

| This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Anthony Nicholas, M.D., associate professor in the Department of Neurology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, is a co-editor of the first textbook on the subject of protein deimination in human health and disease.
Distinguished Professor Uday Vaidya, Ph.D., is the new chair of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering.
An innovative solution for safeguarding personal information relies on your proximity instead of your memory.
Neurologist David Geldmacher, M.D., who leads UAB's memory disorders program, is launching a new clinical effort — the first of its type in the United States — to prepare a personalized dementia risk assessment for people concerned about their risk for developing memory problems as they age. Call 975-7575 for more information or to make an appointment.
The Honors College is home to students from all seven undergraduate colleges and schools and includes challenging courses and academic enrichment, such as research, international study, internships and service learning.
UAB Employee Wellness and the American Heart Association have formed the UAB Circulation Network — a free support group for faculty, staff and family members who have high blood pressure or hypertension. Meetings are held at noon the second Tuesday of each month in West Pavilion Conference Center Room C.
Look for the Farm Stand 8:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Tuesdays in The Kirklin Clinic and Wednesdays in the West Pavilion. Or visit the Farmer's Market 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Fridays in the North Pavilion Entrance; UAB is partnering with the Farmer’s Market Authority to bring some of the state's best produce here.
Jeff Neyland has been named interim vice president for UAB Information Technology. Neyland is a proven business leader and information technologist with experience in Fortune 300 companies, private equity firms and venture capital-backed start-ups.
New series will review cases as they pose questions about the limits to which health-care providers could and should go in the best interests of their patients.
A blood test that measures the health of mitochondria could could prove to be a significant early warning system for people with chronic diseases and help tailor medical interventions based on a patient's genetic makeup. UAB researchers report their findings in the journal Clinical Science.
Page 9 of 42